Los libros de la Bauhaus GRATIS!

arquitectura, Artículos, arte, diseño, Enlaces, Fotografia, ilustración, musica, Sin categoría, tipografía

Los aportes más valiosos al mundo del diseño sin duda los dio la Escuela de la Bauhaus. Se inauguró en Alemania en 1919 y revolucionó los parámetros académicos burgueses del arte de aquella época, estableciendo una nueva visión de lo estético y funcional entre arquitectos, escultores, pintores, etcétera.

Why you should reinvent your typography

diseño, tipografía
Reinvention is the key to exciting typography, as old forms take in new life in the hands of enthusiastic creatives.

Why you should reinvent your typography
Bauhaus Archive identity by Sascha Lobe: Marrying the old and new to create something utterly iconic

What’s been most exciting for me over the last five to 10 years is the fantastic explosion of expressive and exploratory typography and professional fontseverywhere. I’m completely inspired by the emergence of so many type designers 
of tremendous skill and talent, hailing from all over the world. I admire designers like Henrik Kubel, Peter Bil’ak and Kris Sowersby, to name just a few.

They find old forms and reinvent them, or craft seemingly impossible ligatures, or make bizarre stencils, or combine shapes previously unthinkable, and they stretch readability. They increase what is possible. In my 40-plus years of designing, I don’t remember a period when typography has been better crafted, and more appreciated by non-designers. And it’s never been more fun. Every project seems to demand the invention of its own font. It’s so doable – even practical and cost-effective.

Typographic technology, art and craft are more in sync than they have ever been

Typographic technology, art and craft are more in sync than they have ever been.
 I marvel at the typographic dexterity and sophistication of my students. My class of seniors is completely international and diverse, but they seem to have all seized upon the creation of letterforms, in many languages 
and with different alphabets, to create an international way to see. We read the forms first, not the words; we understand what we see before we understand what it says. But it is literate. This is the language of our time.

Why you should reinvent your typography
Paula Scher believes typography is more appreciated than ever before

So I was astonished and delighted last year at a design conference by a presentation by Sascha Lobe on his design for the Bauhaus Archive. He began by talking about what we all believed we know from the Bauhaus: ‘Less is more’, ‘Form follows function’, etc. “Yes, that old lecture again,” I thought.

Then suddenly he began showing the absolutely crazy letterforms established by
the Bauhaus designers. I must have seen them before – I know I had – but never quite this
 way. They hadn’t abandoned their decorative past, they had recycled and reused it. And those guys didn’t take their own advice. Form followed nothing! Less was pointless! They were playing around, having fun and reinventing form. Their work was idiosyncratic, complicated, even sometimes ornate, rich with impossible ligatures and bizarre spacing.

Why you should reinvent your typography
The Bauhaus Design Archive solves contemporary design problems

Sascha had culled the Bauhaus Archive for inspiration to solve a contemporary problem, and what he’d found through that lens was utterly contemporary. He took the crazy letterforms the designers had created and used them to build a new alphabet that married the old and new in a way that’s emblematic of the Bauhaus in of our time.
 It’s the best use of a combination of historical and contemporary typographic form I have ever seen. But it’s what we are all doing, have been doing and will be doing.

We constantly look for trends and want to spot what we perceive as new, and what will be influential in the future. But there isn’t really anything new. There are only individuals with passion finding interesting, challenging and often provocative ways to reinvent what will always continue.

This article was originally published in Computer Arts magazine issue 253. Buy it here.

Fuente: http://www.creativebloq.com

La agencia YOKE de Australia y sus diseños innovadores para el banco NAB

arte, diseño

Diseño editorial de los mejores estudios del mundo. I Like Birds in Trittau; Mucho’s Tenderloin; Cercle on Costumes and P98a Paper’s Zombies of Berlin

Artículos, arte, diseño, Enlaces, tipografía

Here is a small selection of graphic design for galleries and museums and magazines that caught our attention in recent weeks.

Hamburg-based design studio I Like Birds, founded by André Gröger and Susanne Kehrer, have recently completed a commission for Galerie in der Wassermühle Trittau in Trittau, Germany. The studio developed a visual system for the gallery’s printed matter – catalogues, invitations, posters and flyers – and also redesigned their website. All outputs take inspiration from fachwerk or timber framing and make good use of bold typography set vertically, horizontally and at sharp 45 degree angles.

Catalogues for Galerie in der Wassermühle Trittau. Design: I Like Birds.
Top: spread from
P98a Paper, RalphMartin’s ‘Zombies of Berlin’ with map illustration by Susanna Dulkinys.

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Poster for ‘Maxim Brandt: Fantastic Imperfections’.

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A rare copy of P98a Paper (Galerie p98a, £9.80) themed ‘Zombies of Berlin’ was handed to us by Erik Spiekermann in Eye’s De Beauvoir Town studio. The journal was made by Spiekermann, Susanna Dulkinys, R. Jay Magill Jr. and Ferdinand Ulrich. More issues, themed ‘The Fashion Issue’, ‘The Nepotism Issue’ and ‘European Travel Journal’ will follow. The small format publication is risograph printed with a letterpress cover (printed on a Korrex Proofing Press) that features an illustration by Christoph Neimann and responds to the team’s ‘itch to put out a modern magazine that would take an ancient form – actual paper, printed in-house, for a select audience of people who like such things’.

Each issue will feature a long form piece of fiction or non-fiction; P98a Paper no. 01, sadly now sold out, features Ralph Martin’s ‘Zombies of Berlin’, dotted with two-colour illustrations in black and luminous orange.

 

Spread from P98a Paper no. 01, designed bySusanna Dulkinys.

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P98a Paper, Galerie p98a, £9.80.

Paper-cover_01

International design studio Mucho has recently launched the identity, printed matter, merchandise and sign system for the Tenderloin Museumin San Francisco. The museum celebrates the Tenderloin District’s history and the people who frequented it – figures such as author Dashiell Hammett, jazz musician Miles Davis and rock band the Grateful Dead. The identity uses an eclectic custom typeface inspired by letterforms found on local signage for porn establishments, drug rehabilitation centres, coffee shops and hotels that are paired with a woodblock font ‘to help suggest the gritty nature of the area’. Read more about Mucho in the ‘Reputations’ article in Eye 89.

Identity for the Tenderloin Museum, which borrows letterforms from local signage. Design: Mucho.

tenderloin_01

 

One in a series of posters designed by Mucho for the Tenderloin Museum, San Francisco.

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Merchandise that references the Tenderloin District’s history of ‘girls, gambling and graft’.

tenderloin_07

Cercle Magazine no. 4 is the product of Strasbourg-based graphic design studio Cercle Studio and is published in two editions – a French edition with English translations of interviews and an English edition co-published with IdN Hong Kong. This issue looks at ‘Costumes’ (previous issues have focussed on ‘The forest’, ‘Science fiction’ and ‘Insects’) and is rich with costume drawings, illustrations and photographs from international artists and designers such as costume designer Camille Assaf, photographer Charles Fréger and designer Studio Bertjan Pot who explore ideas of costuming and dressing the body.

Spread showing work by Swiss photographer and designer Marie Rime.

Cercle_3

 

Cercle no. 4 2016 themed ‘Costumes’. Editorial direction: Marie Secher. Art direction: Cercle Studio.

Cercleno4_cover

Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It is available from all good design bookshops and online at theEye shop, where you can buy subscriptions and single issues.

Illustrator vs. Photoshop

Artículos, diseño, Sin categoría

El diseñador M.A. Kather creó un proyecto sobre las diferencias entre Illustrator y Photoshop, explicado en un simple diseño minimalista. ¿Cuál es tu favorito? Nacimiento:   Primera versión:   Más usado para..   Más usado por..   El zoom:   Tablero de arte: Máscara de recorte: Selección:   Capas: Volver atrás: Área de trabajo:   Tiempo que tardan en […]

https://florenciasalcedo.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/illustrator-vs-photoshop/