Type on the campaign trail

Artículos, arte, derechos, diseño, Enlaces, Fotografia, ilustración, Sin categoría, tipografía

US designers contribute type, posters, badges and branding to the Hillary Clinton cause

 

From the outset, the Hillary Clinton campaign has enlisted the help of some of the United States’ best designers to portray and propagate her messages.

The Hillary Clinton campaign identity designed byMichael Bierut and his team atPentagram.

HillaryforAmerica

Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team designed the campaign identity in 2015 which used Sharp Type foundry’s typeface Sharp Sans Display No.1 as the foundation for their identity system. The foundry’s co-founder Lucas Sharp saw this application as an ‘opportunity to take the design further. We had drawn a tightly spaced, Lubalin-esque geometric sans that looked really good big. Now we wanted to draw a version with utility and versatility, that could work in any situation.’

 

‘Stronger Together’ is set in Sharp Slab for Hillary.

StrongerTogether

Bierut’s extensive identity system would be used by all manner of people on the campaign trail – from professionals to volunteer organisers – which meant that the detailed instructions laid out in the style guide for tracking a display face used for other applications were unlikely to be followed. Sharp writes, ‘It occurred to us that a serious presidential campaign needs a typeface that can work in any situation.’ As a result, Sharp Sans grew to include Sharp Unity for Hillary, Sharp Slab for Hillary, Sharp Slab Extrabold, Sharp Slab Book, Sharp Stencil for Hillary and Sharp Stencil.

 

Examples of Sharp Slab for Hillary,Sharp Unity for Hillary, Sharp Stencil for Hillary, Sharp Slab Extrabold, Sharp Slab Book and examples of several of the fonts in use on a campaign bus.

type_comp

Jennifer Kinon of design and branding agency Original Champions of Design (OCD) stepped away from her agency role to become Hillary Clinton campaign’s design director. Kinon was tasked with rolling out and extending from the identity designed by Michael Bierut (Pentagram) that used the Sharp Sans family. Both Bierut and Sharp have praised Kinon’s work online and many of her designs have gone viral including the ‘Love Trumps Hope’ image.

 

A selection of Hillary merchandise.

HillYes

Other design led initiatives in support of Hillary Clinton include The Forty-Five Pin Project and 30 Reasons with work by designers such as Matt Dorfman, Elizabeth Resnick and Craig Frazier.

 

30 Reasons posters by Elizabeth Amorose, OCD,Bonnie Siegler andLarkin Werner.

30Posters_comp

 

Vote.

Hill_vote

 

Hillary for Americavideo showing Pentagram’s identity in action.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/169739384

Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It is available from all good design bookshops and online at the Eye shop, where you can buy subscriptions and single issues.

Anuncios

A new life for old type: Pentagram’s identity for Pink Floyd Records

arquitectura, Artículos, arte, diseño, Enlaces, Fotografia, ilustración, musica, Sin categoría, tipografía

 

Pentagram partner Harry Pearce talks us through designing an identity for Pink Floyd Records and a lavish 27-disc box set for the band

Pentagram’s alphabet for Pink Floyd Records, based on the stencil lettering from the cover of the band’s 1977 album, Animals

Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson’s record sleeves for Pink Floyd are some of the most memorable of all time. Working under the name Hipgnosis, the pair’s surreal imagery inspired generations of designers and have become enduring symbols of the band’s music. Think of Pink Floyd, and it’s near impossible not to imagine the prism on the cover of Dark Side of the Moon or the bright pink pig on the sleeve of Animals.

Pink Floyd’s music and visual output is the subject of a major retrospective opening at London’s V&A Museum in May. In November last year, the band released a 27-disc box set of early singles and recordings on their record label Pink Floyd Records.

The identity for Pink Floyd Records was designed by Pentagram partner Harry Pearce and his creative team and is based on the stencil lettering from the cover of Animals. Designer Johannes Grimmond worked with Pearce to create a complete alphabet based on the original letterforms, giving the label a distinctive logotype. The alphabet can also be used as a headline font on new releases and merchandise.

Pink Floyd Records logotype. The alphabet can also be used as a headline font
Edition numbering for record label releases
Edition numbering for record label releases

Pearce says he initially experimented with creating something new for the label but decided that the lettering “just had a wonderful quality to it.”

“The stencil somehow feels evocative of the stencilling on all their equipment and their boxes…. It’s such a wonderful, idiosyncratic bit of type that we just felt it deserved a bigger life than it had already,” he told CR. “[The band and Powell] loved the idea and it’s right in the middle of the canon of all of their work.”

Creating a complete alphabet based on the design was quite a challenge. “It was originally made to be on a 12″ LP … when you take that typeface and make it very small, which it often had to be, all of the inter-character work, the huge contrast between the stencil cuts through the lettering was so narrow that you reduce it down and it just sort of closes up,” says Pearce. “That was one challenge and the fact was that we just didn’t have that many letters, so we did an analysis of the forms of letters that were there and built a system on that.”

Pearce and his team also designed The Early Years 1965 – 72, which features early singles and previously unreleased recordings from Pink Floyd’s archives.

The black-and-white outer casing takes inspiration from the Bedford van that the band once drove around in (see gallery above). Discs are packaged in seven volumes – one for each year between 1965 and 72 – and each one features a painting by artist John Whiteley (an old friend of Powell’s) on its cover.

Whiteley created the artworks during the band’s early years but – like much of the material on the box set – they have never before been released. “Those beautiful works of his have never seen the light of day so that was a lovely continuity there,” says Pearce. “They aren’t modern versions of his work, they were made at the same time [as the recordings].”

A2’s Typewriter font is used throughout the packaging, offering a more contemporary take on traditional typewriter lettering. “We thought that was relevant, as even though [the box set] is old material, we’re cataloguing it today, so it isn’t just all nostalgia.”

Booklets contain lyrics and photographs from Pink Floyd’s archives, many of which have never before been published. The box set also features some lovely added touches. The spine of each volume bears a unique reference number and a word representing that year’s output. Roger Waters came up with the words for each year and each one is intercepted with a forward slash, providing another reference to the white stripe on the Bedford van.

Pentagram worked closely with Aubrey Powell on the design of the identity and the box set. “He was a bit like our filter really. He’s so intimate with the band, we took his advice on the directions and ideas [that were presented to him] and he took them to the band. Him being a designer himself, it was a really sympatico relationship,” says Pearce.

As a long time fan of Pink Floyd’s, Pearce describes the project as “a complete joy”.

“When I was a teen in the 1970s listening to that stuff, holding that 12″ sleeves in my hands, never did I dream I’d one day be working with some of that material,” he says. “Some of that music was founding stuff for me back in the 70s, so it’s a very precious thing to do and we took immense care on this project.”

“That’s probably another reason why we honoured the lovely lettering on that original Animals album [for the identity],” he adds. “We could have imposed our own style on to this … we could have invented a new logo, but this just seemed to resonate so much more – the fact that we were honouring and using things that already existed and giving them a new and extended life.”

Pearce has also written an ‘outro’ for forthcoming Thames & Hudson book Vinyl. Album. Cover. Art: The Complete Hignosis Catalogue.

You can read our interview with Aubrey Powell about the work of Hipgnosis and his partnership with Thorgerson here.

Fuente: www.creativereview.co.uk

Los libros de la Bauhaus GRATIS!

arquitectura, Artículos, arte, diseño, Enlaces, Fotografia, ilustración, musica, Sin categoría, tipografía

Los aportes más valiosos al mundo del diseño sin duda los dio la Escuela de la Bauhaus. Se inauguró en Alemania en 1919 y revolucionó los parámetros académicos burgueses del arte de aquella época, estableciendo una nueva visión de lo estético y funcional entre arquitectos, escultores, pintores, etcétera.

Why you should reinvent your typography

diseño, tipografía
Reinvention is the key to exciting typography, as old forms take in new life in the hands of enthusiastic creatives.

Why you should reinvent your typography
Bauhaus Archive identity by Sascha Lobe: Marrying the old and new to create something utterly iconic

What’s been most exciting for me over the last five to 10 years is the fantastic explosion of expressive and exploratory typography and professional fontseverywhere. I’m completely inspired by the emergence of so many type designers 
of tremendous skill and talent, hailing from all over the world. I admire designers like Henrik Kubel, Peter Bil’ak and Kris Sowersby, to name just a few.

They find old forms and reinvent them, or craft seemingly impossible ligatures, or make bizarre stencils, or combine shapes previously unthinkable, and they stretch readability. They increase what is possible. In my 40-plus years of designing, I don’t remember a period when typography has been better crafted, and more appreciated by non-designers. And it’s never been more fun. Every project seems to demand the invention of its own font. It’s so doable – even practical and cost-effective.

Typographic technology, art and craft are more in sync than they have ever been

Typographic technology, art and craft are more in sync than they have ever been.
 I marvel at the typographic dexterity and sophistication of my students. My class of seniors is completely international and diverse, but they seem to have all seized upon the creation of letterforms, in many languages 
and with different alphabets, to create an international way to see. We read the forms first, not the words; we understand what we see before we understand what it says. But it is literate. This is the language of our time.

Why you should reinvent your typography
Paula Scher believes typography is more appreciated than ever before

So I was astonished and delighted last year at a design conference by a presentation by Sascha Lobe on his design for the Bauhaus Archive. He began by talking about what we all believed we know from the Bauhaus: ‘Less is more’, ‘Form follows function’, etc. “Yes, that old lecture again,” I thought.

Then suddenly he began showing the absolutely crazy letterforms established by
the Bauhaus designers. I must have seen them before – I know I had – but never quite this
 way. They hadn’t abandoned their decorative past, they had recycled and reused it. And those guys didn’t take their own advice. Form followed nothing! Less was pointless! They were playing around, having fun and reinventing form. Their work was idiosyncratic, complicated, even sometimes ornate, rich with impossible ligatures and bizarre spacing.

Why you should reinvent your typography
The Bauhaus Design Archive solves contemporary design problems

Sascha had culled the Bauhaus Archive for inspiration to solve a contemporary problem, and what he’d found through that lens was utterly contemporary. He took the crazy letterforms the designers had created and used them to build a new alphabet that married the old and new in a way that’s emblematic of the Bauhaus in of our time.
 It’s the best use of a combination of historical and contemporary typographic form I have ever seen. But it’s what we are all doing, have been doing and will be doing.

We constantly look for trends and want to spot what we perceive as new, and what will be influential in the future. But there isn’t really anything new. There are only individuals with passion finding interesting, challenging and often provocative ways to reinvent what will always continue.

This article was originally published in Computer Arts magazine issue 253. Buy it here.

Fuente: http://www.creativebloq.com

¿Sabías que la Fanta fue creada durante el régimen nazi después que Coca-Cola suspendiera el suministro a Alemania?

Artículos, diseño

Efectivamente, la Fanta fue creada en la Alemania Nazi durante la segunda guerra mundial.
El problema llegó en diciembre de 1941, cuando los EE.UU entraron en la guerra, y las relaciones entre Coca-Cola GmbH y la empresa madre se perdieron. Los empresarios alemanes dueños de las embotelladoras se encontraron con la imposibilidad de seguir fabricando la bebida. Entonces, Max Keith el jefe de la Coca-Cola Deutschland en Alemania nazi, creó el producto utilizando sólo ingredientes disponibles, incluyendo suero de leche y orujo de manzana (las “sobras de las sobras que nadie quería”).

fanta_nazi_2

La planta alemana fue efectivamente aislada de la sede de Coca-Cola durante la guerra. Después de la guerra, la compañía Coca-Cola recuperó el control de la planta, la fórmula y las marcas a los nuevos beneficios de productos, así como la planta de Fanta hechas durante la guerra.

Hitler-Fanta--700x329

El nuevo refresco fue un éxito rotundo y en 1943 se vendieron tres millones de botellas, sólo dos millones menos que de Coca Cola en años anteriores. Sin embargo, las cifras podían estar algo falseadas, pues la población compraba Fanta para tés e infusiones debido a que el racionamiento de azúcar era extremo entre los alemanes. En cualquier caso, había nacido una nueva bebida, y lo había hecho bajo el régimen nazi.

Fanta se suspendió cuando la empresa matriz se reunió con la rama alemana. Tras el lanzamiento de varias bebidas por la corporación de Pepsi en la década de 1950, Coca-Cola compitió por el relanzamiento de Fanta en 1955.

Fuente: heritagedaily.com

34 free font resources

Artículos, diseño

There are plenty of places to download typeface on the web. But which of them contain the best free fonts? There’s a lot of noise and clutter online, and it’s easy to end up falling down the rabbit hole of poorly structured sites and low quality fonts. So we’ve taken on ourselves to find you the gems in the rough.

Besides the obvious places to download free fonts, we’ve also unearthed some less known sources – including personal design portfolios, agency sites and type projects. So next time you want to download fonts, start discovering a world of typographical inspiration!

01. Behance

Free font resources: Behance
You’ll find all manner of free font designs on Behance

The go-to place for designers to show off their work, online portfolio platform Behance is a brilliant place to find free fonts. Whether you want a slab serif, script, tattoo or handwriting font, you’re sure to find something that suits here.

02. HypeForType

Free font resources: HypeForType
HypeForType features over 25000 designs from top designers – and some are free!

Online font foundry HypeForType features over 25000 designs from top designers, and a whole chunk of those are available for you to download for free. Definitely one to bookmark.

03. Artimasa

Free font resources: Artimasa
Download some beautiful fonts for free over on Artimasa

Artimasa a ‘small lettering and type design studio with big dream’. These guys feature all manner of different type designs, with a few popular designs available for you to download and enjoy for free.

04. The Northern Block

Free font resources: The Northern Block
The Northern Block offers a number of free font designs

Created by creative director Jonathan Hill back in 2006, type foundry The Northern Block offers a number of free fonts. From stencil and bold to modern and geometric designs, you’re sure to find something suitable for your project here.

05. Fontcab

Download fonts: Fontcab
Find that perfect font without wasting valuable time

It can be difficult to find that perfect font. Font Cab aims to make it easier for you to find great fonts without wasting time. The simple layout of the website makes it easy to navigate through the fonts without much effort.

06. The Open Font Library

Download fonts: The Open Font Library
There’s plenty to choose from with this extensive font catalogue

The Open Font Library showcases fonts that are free to use, study, share and rework for personal creative work. There’s plenty to choose from with their extensive catalogue that also includes a wide range of web fonts.

07. Free Font Manifesto

Download fonts: Free Font Manifesto
What is a free font exactly? Find out here…

A small but growing number of designers and institutions are creating typefaces for the public domain. Free Font Manifesto provides information and airs ideas about the concept of free fonts.

08. Fontellium

Download fonts: Fontellium
Fontellium is a valuable resource for history-tinged free fonts

Fontellium is rather unique – a font site that brings together a collection of historical style fonts. With categories including everything from Egypta to Art Nouveau, this is the perfect place to find free fonts for your historical projects.

09. Vitaly Friedman’s Font List

Download fonts: Font List
Get serious with this list of handy business fonts

This list of the 20 best free quality fonts from Vitaly Friedman are more likely to be used for official, serious presentations (such as business sites) than a colourful teenager’s homepage.

10. Fonstruct

Download fonts: Fonstruct
Find user-generated fonts at Fontstruct

Fonstruct is a place where the community can design fonts and share them with others for free. Obviously that means there are a lot of fonts to search through, and more are added every day. The site’s easy to navigate and the best fonts are picked for the Fonstruct gallery.

11. Adobe Edge Web Fonts

Download fonts: Adobe Edge
A fantastic font resource from the team at Adobe

Edge Web Fonts gives you access to a vast web font library made possible by contributions from Adobe, Google, and designers around the world. The fonts are served by Typekit, so you can be sure of high performance and stability. Plus, it’s free!

12. The Fell Types

Download fonts: Fell Types
You’ll find modern digitalisations of these unique printing fonts

Igino Marini runs iKern: a service for autospacing and autokerning digital typefaces based on a mathematical model and programmes he developed since 2002. When he’s not doing that, he set up a site devoted to the Fell Types with some modern revival fonts.

The Fell Types take their name from John Fell, a Bishop of Oxford in the seventeenth century, who created a unique collection of printing types. Here, you’ll find digitalised versions of them for use in your design projects.

13. 1001 Free Fonts

Misnomer alert! We’re certain that 1001 Free Fonts doesn’t feature exactly 1001 free fonts; we reckon that it’s actually a lot more than that – probably something more in the region of 10,001 – and all of them handily organised across 64 categories, along with the option to browse by designer.

14. Abstract fonts

Download fonts: Abstract fonts
This place to download fonts has a clean interface

Abstract Fonts has one of the cleaner interfaces in this arena, and it’s very easy to navigate. There’s a custom font preview option and it’s updated regularly, with about 14,000 fonts for you to choose from.

15. Jeff Schreiber

Download fonts: Schreiber
It’s quality, not quantity with Jeff’s font creations

Jeff Schreiber is a designer, illustrator and typographer from Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Although he doesn’t have too many fonts available on his site, it’s all about quality and not quantity here. His ‘Razor’ creation is brilliant for print and poster work, with his ‘Fat Frank’ font offers a more playful approach.

16. Neogrey

Download fonts: Neogrey
Be sure to check out Ivan’s Multicoloure Vector font

Neogrey is the portfolio of Ivan Filipov. Working as a graphic and web designer, he’s created some stunning fonts that he’s very generously made available for free download. We particularly love his latest font, a multicolore vector font that was released just over two weeks ago.

17. Smashing Magazine

Download fonts: Smashing
There’s some great fonts to choose from on this round-up from Smashing Mag

Smashing Magazine provide a wide range of tutorials, inspiration and helpful advise for creatives on a daily basis. The site also has a great series of articles collating quality free fonts for you to choose from. These guys know what they’re talking about, so it’s a reliable place to download free fonts from.

18. The Oatmeal

Download fonts: Oatmeal
Check out the free font you like, then download it from the list

If you’re looking for free comic fonts, The Oatmeal has provided this handly list of the free fonts used on its site.

19. Artill

Artill is minimalism at its best

Created by Lukas Bischoff, a designer based in Germany, Artill is a  nice little website that’s aimed purely at people wishing to download free fonts. Minimalism at its best, and some great typography to be sampled.

20. TypeDepot

Download fonts: Typedepot
Type design studio TypeDepot offers both free and paid-for fonts

TypeDepot is a nifty little type-design studio website that offers a number of free fonts for visitors to download. There are also great commercial fonts to buy.

21. Wete

Download fonts: Wete
Spanish designer Wete’s site features some great free fonts to download

There are many ongoing typography projects to be found on Wetecacahuete.com. Wete is a Spanish graphic designer who loves typography and editorial design. Head here to download free fonts such as Favela.

22. Josip Kelava

Download fonts: Kelava
Get some typographic inspiration from the work of Josip Kelava

Check out this gallery of design works created by Josip Kelava, a Melbourne-based designer. You’ll find elements of typographical inspiration in each of his projects, and you can download free fonts such as Metropolis into the bargain.

23. Freeware Fonts Project

Download fonts: Freeware
Many great type designers have contributed to the Freeware Fonts Project

A massive collection of free fonts is being shared by type designers as part of this project curated by Jovanny Lemonad. They’re totally free and everyone can take part in the project. If you like what you download, you may consider making a donation.

24. Glukfonts

Download fonts: Glukfonts
Polish designer Gluksza offers some great free design resources

Glukfonts is the site of Polish designer Gluksza, which offers some nicely designed typography. You can download free fonts and other design resources too, including PHP scripts.

25. FontFabric

Download fonts: FontFabric
Check out the freebie section of independent type foundry FontFabric

An independent type foundry launched by Bulgarian designer Svetoslav Simov, FontFabric includes a lot of paid fonts but its freebie section is also a great place to download free fonts.

26. LostType

Download fonts: LostType
LostType offers you the chance to pay whatever you like

Founded by Riley Cran and Tyler Galpin, LostType is a type foundry that offers you the chance to pay whatever you like for a font (and yes, it’s possible to type in ‘$0’ for a free download).

27. Dafont.com

Download fonts: DaFont
Dafont.com has a massive archive of free fonts to search – including novelty fonts like this

Dafont.com is a massive archive of freely downloadable fonts. Browse by alphabetical listing, by style, by author or by popularity. A lot of it is on the unprofessional side but you can find some choice stuff here. It’s also a good place if you’re looking to download free fonts with a novelty theme, like the Pacman font featured above.

28. Font Squirrel

Download fonts: Font Squirrel
Font Squirrel’s free fonts are mostly @font-face compatible

Want to download free fonts for commercial use? Then Font Squirrel is the place to head. The quality of the fonts is high, they’re mostly @font-face compatible, plus it’s got a very nicely designed website into the bargain.

29. Ten by Twenty

Download fonts: Ten by Twenty
Ed Merritt’s site Ten by Twenty offers some excellent free fonts

Ten by Twenty is the impressive creation of Ed Merritt, a designer at UK web design agency Headscape. You can download free fonts from his site, as well as templates, themes and icons, for your web design projects – all of high quality.

30. Kevin and Amanda

Download fonts: Kevin and Amanda
Kevin and Amanda offer some amazingly cute and colourful fonts

If you want to download free fonts for a craft or scrapbook-themed project, then head to Kevin and Amanda. It offers over 500 handwriting and scrapbooking fonts to download for free and they’re adored by fans of cute across the world.

31. Google Web Fonts

Download fonts: Google
Google Web Fonts makes it easy to use web fonts on your site

Google Web Fonts makes it quick and easy for everyone to use web fonts on their site. All of the fonts are open source, so you’re free to share and customise them for your own use, or collaborate with the original designer to improve them. And you can use them in every way you want, privately or commercially: in print, on your computer, or in your websites.

32. The League of Movable Type

Download fonts: LoMT
The League of Movable Type is the first free and open-source type foundry

Github project The League of Movable Type is a typographical revolution in the making and anyone looking to download free fonts should make a beeline for it. The very first free and open-source type foundry, it’s a hand-selected group of typographers who’ve created an amazing set of high-quality free fonts for all to download, such as the popular League Gothic.

33. Impallari

Download fonts: Impallari
There’s a lot of detail of how the free fonts at Impallari were made

“I think that typefaces are living beings,” says Pablo Impallari, “they  continue to evolve over time. Even if the original designer died over 500 years ago, contemporary designers push their ideas forward, keeping up keeping up with the always-shifting way we perceive the alphabet.” You can find some incredible fonts at his site, Impallari. There’s a lot of detail in updates too, which gives a helpful insight in how they’re put together.

34. Iconian

Commercial transaction attorney by day, by night Dan Zadorozny creates fonts that are free for non-commercial use (if you want to use them commercially, that’ll cost you pretty reasonable $20 donation). There are hundreds to choose from; they’re ordered alphabetically, so your best bet’s just to sift through them until you find something you like the look of.

Diseño editorial de los mejores estudios del mundo. I Like Birds in Trittau; Mucho’s Tenderloin; Cercle on Costumes and P98a Paper’s Zombies of Berlin

Artículos, arte, diseño, Enlaces, tipografía

Here is a small selection of graphic design for galleries and museums and magazines that caught our attention in recent weeks.

Hamburg-based design studio I Like Birds, founded by André Gröger and Susanne Kehrer, have recently completed a commission for Galerie in der Wassermühle Trittau in Trittau, Germany. The studio developed a visual system for the gallery’s printed matter – catalogues, invitations, posters and flyers – and also redesigned their website. All outputs take inspiration from fachwerk or timber framing and make good use of bold typography set vertically, horizontally and at sharp 45 degree angles.

Catalogues for Galerie in der Wassermühle Trittau. Design: I Like Birds.
Top: spread from
P98a Paper, RalphMartin’s ‘Zombies of Berlin’ with map illustration by Susanna Dulkinys.

1792

Poster for ‘Maxim Brandt: Fantastic Imperfections’.

1814

A rare copy of P98a Paper (Galerie p98a, £9.80) themed ‘Zombies of Berlin’ was handed to us by Erik Spiekermann in Eye’s De Beauvoir Town studio. The journal was made by Spiekermann, Susanna Dulkinys, R. Jay Magill Jr. and Ferdinand Ulrich. More issues, themed ‘The Fashion Issue’, ‘The Nepotism Issue’ and ‘European Travel Journal’ will follow. The small format publication is risograph printed with a letterpress cover (printed on a Korrex Proofing Press) that features an illustration by Christoph Neimann and responds to the team’s ‘itch to put out a modern magazine that would take an ancient form – actual paper, printed in-house, for a select audience of people who like such things’.

Each issue will feature a long form piece of fiction or non-fiction; P98a Paper no. 01, sadly now sold out, features Ralph Martin’s ‘Zombies of Berlin’, dotted with two-colour illustrations in black and luminous orange.

 

Spread from P98a Paper no. 01, designed bySusanna Dulkinys.

paper-01_04

 

P98a Paper, Galerie p98a, £9.80.

Paper-cover_01

International design studio Mucho has recently launched the identity, printed matter, merchandise and sign system for the Tenderloin Museumin San Francisco. The museum celebrates the Tenderloin District’s history and the people who frequented it – figures such as author Dashiell Hammett, jazz musician Miles Davis and rock band the Grateful Dead. The identity uses an eclectic custom typeface inspired by letterforms found on local signage for porn establishments, drug rehabilitation centres, coffee shops and hotels that are paired with a woodblock font ‘to help suggest the gritty nature of the area’. Read more about Mucho in the ‘Reputations’ article in Eye 89.

Identity for the Tenderloin Museum, which borrows letterforms from local signage. Design: Mucho.

tenderloin_01

 

One in a series of posters designed by Mucho for the Tenderloin Museum, San Francisco.

tenderloin_06

Merchandise that references the Tenderloin District’s history of ‘girls, gambling and graft’.

tenderloin_07

Cercle Magazine no. 4 is the product of Strasbourg-based graphic design studio Cercle Studio and is published in two editions – a French edition with English translations of interviews and an English edition co-published with IdN Hong Kong. This issue looks at ‘Costumes’ (previous issues have focussed on ‘The forest’, ‘Science fiction’ and ‘Insects’) and is rich with costume drawings, illustrations and photographs from international artists and designers such as costume designer Camille Assaf, photographer Charles Fréger and designer Studio Bertjan Pot who explore ideas of costuming and dressing the body.

Spread showing work by Swiss photographer and designer Marie Rime.

Cercle_3

 

Cercle no. 4 2016 themed ‘Costumes’. Editorial direction: Marie Secher. Art direction: Cercle Studio.

Cercleno4_cover

Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It is available from all good design bookshops and online at theEye shop, where you can buy subscriptions and single issues.

Tipos de madera

arte, diseño, Enlaces, tipografía

Es la primera vez que me encuentro con estos en persona. Tipos de madera que un impresor, en su puesto dominguero del Mercado de «chácharas» de La Lagunilla, ya consciente y adaptado a los métodos de impresión digitales, las decidió vender como objetos artísticos o históricos por tenerlas en desuso. Un modo de escritura mecánica que tiene orígenes […]

a través de https://parangoneblog.wordpress.com/

Cyrus Highsmith, sobre sus clases de tipografía

Artículos, Enlaces

«Un curso corto de diseño de tipografía no te convertirá en un diseñador tipográfico , pero hará de ti un mejor tipógrafo.»

Cuando estoy formando a un nuevo empleado en Font Bureau, estoy trabajando con una persona con talento centrada en lo que realmente quiere ser, un diseñador tipográfico. Disponemos del tiempo necesario para ello, usualmente uno o dos años y la atención está dirigida hacia la técnica y los resultados.
Pero cuando estoy enseñando la asignatura optativa de diseño de tipografías en laescuela de diseño de Rhode Island (RISD), la situación es diferente. En vez de trabajar con una persona lo hago con un grupo y aunque muchos de los estudiantes tienen también talento y están centrados en lo que hacen, ellos no quieren ser diseñadores tipográficos. Mis estudiantes son estudiantes de diseño gráfico. Ellos quieren ser diseñadores gráficos y en cuanto al diseño de tipos solamente quieren probarlo durante doce semanas.
Sin embargo, yo estoy lo suficientemente interesado en la materia de diseño de tipografías como para haberla impartido durante casi quince años. Me llevó algún tiempo antes de reconocer las diferencias entre formar y enseñar y cuando finalmente lo hice, tengo que confesar que, al menos al principio, encontré la idea de enseñar ciertamente desalentadora.